Don’t despair, old music snobs. Blip.fm can help find new sounds

FROM JASON’S EARDRUMS – I’m getting old, and radio is repulsive now.

Sure, there was a time when I was hooked. I was an FM junky at 16, spending hours dialing up music by the orange electric glow of my stereo receiver. Everything was new still, and I was doing the teenage thing: Deciding what I liked as part of defining my own personality.

More than a decade later, I know exactly who I am. I know what I like. I know what I don’t like. And I don’t want to become one of those pathetic easy listening adults who only listen to Rod Stewart and Michael Bolton. Ugh.

The trouble now is finding music that’s artistically good, still has an edge, and is meaningful without indulging in all that teen angst bull that’s floating around out there. So I started experimenting with Blip.fm, the social networking tool for tune addicts.

I have my own channel, where I post songs to stream out into the ether, to be caught by anyone interested in my white-boy-aging-and-fat-hipster-inspired-by-old-LPs taste. While pushing my own selections, I can browse through the Twitter-esque offerings of other “DJs” and browse a large number of random tunes in a very short span.

In three days of use, I’ve found a handful of new sounds to fill out my iPod playlist:

Metric – Help, I’m Alive

The Faint – The Geeks Were Right

Goldfrapp – Strict Machine

Cage the Elephant – Ain’t No Rest for the Wicked

I also picked up some classics that were blatantly missing from my collection, including titles from The Velvet Underground, The Cure, Iggy Pop, Johnny Cash, and Van Morrison. These had previously just fallen through the cracks in my memory, and were nicely jogged by the odd “blip.”

There is a downside to Blip.fm’s buffet-style music surfing: There’s very little emotional connection to the music. Honestly, most of my favorite songs are linked to specific movies or television shows. Soundtrack music comes with visual luggage. That’s what made the old MTV era (when they actually had videos — remember that?) so great. It provided a new dimension of context to the music.

With Blip.fm, we get a lot of noise, little context. But I guess that’s been radio for a long time now, and is a main reason why I ditched actual FM in favor of YouTube and iPod (other than endless trash jockey talk and commercial interruptions, plus ad populum garbage).

Despite my enthusiasm, Andrew’s not digging blips either. His bone: “They don’t have the songs I want… It’s too mainstream.” I asked how he defines mainstream. “Anything I don’t like,” he answered. So there you have it.

Apparently I’m not the only new acolyte, though. According to the site’s dev blog, new users have been flooding the site faster than they can keep up with server power. The result has been sporadic crashes. During one Monday night about 10 p.m., the site went down, and when it reloaded this gem appeared before the UI came up:

blipboot

I can get behind anyone or any service with that sense of humor.

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